Tag Archives: short film

GEARS and the Film Set Experience

Back in February, I was kept busy working my first job on a professional film set. No, it wasn’t a huge Hollywood project with a multi-million-dollar budget and a plethora of big-time actors, but it had more hierarchical structure and technical prowess than a few guys getting together with a Canon Vixia and saying: “Hey, let’s make a movie!”

A little info. about the film itself: the film is a short entitled GEARS, and it is being produced by the student-run Production Club at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. From the film’s Facebook page, the synopsis is as follows:

“GEARS is a sci-fi drama about a father and daughter who live in a typical, suburban home. After the daughter is in a near fatal accident, the over-protective father investigates the origin of an unknown gear discovered after the incident. As his daughter is recovering, he continues to find intricate gears throughout their home.”

The film has been funded through grants and kickstarter projects, allowing the club to use professional equipment such as the RED camera (pictured below). It has been filmed at multiple locations in the Milwaukee area. (The project is in the middle of filming right now–inclement weather at the end of February set back our last weekend of filming, so those days have been rescheduled for the end of March.)
On the set I’ve helped out on the sound department, usually as boom operator (that’s the microphone on the end of a long pole). I’ve also helped out with the art department.

Because Milwaukee isn’t particularly a big hub for the film industry, it’s a privilege that this project even exists. Production Club is giving the film students of UWM a chance to experience what it is like to work in the industry: it’s immersing them into the structure of a film crew and allowing them to discover just how much time and effort goes into creating even a short film. When you realize just how many specific jobs there are behind the scenes to make the film perfect, it’s both a humbling and an empowering experience.

That being said…

The best way I can describe being on a film set is to say that it is almost surreal. That may be confusing…let me explain: When you’re on the set, you’re looking at the setting of the film that you’ll be watching later, and it’s absolutely clogged with cameras, lights, people, and a bunch of other equipment. When a scene is being shot you see the actors moving about and reciting their lines, yet you also see the camera and sound crews moving around to catch their every movement. The scenes themselves are also a hassle to set up–sometimes taking upwards of half an hour. Also, the actors, when not filming, will occasionally act out of character–like regular people. Yet, when the final product is seen, none of this is visible: you don’t see the equipment and the people that filled up the whole house in the background even though you knew it was there all along; the scene doesn’t run for half an hour showing its entire set-up; and the actors seem to embrace the characters that they are–completely alien from the normal people you know from behind the camera. What I’m trying to say (and pardon me for rehashing basic film theory) is that film viewing is subjecting yourself to an illusion: in the back of your mind you know that what you’re viewing isn’t real yet you ignore those facts for the time that you sit in front of the film and take it all in, and being a part of a film crew turns the tables for you are now the one creating the illusion. It’s empowering, in a way.

Or maybe the surreality is just a result of the 12-plus-hour days on the set and a lack of sleep…

More information can be found at these links for GEARS and UWM’s Production Club.